Can you talk the economy into recession?

A series of economic indicators are suggesting that businesses have pulled back their spending amid fear of a recession. But can talk of a recession make one happen? Plus: The latest Fed meeting minutes, virtual reality in the workplace and how an unexpected inheritance can complicate grief.

Teaching artificial intelligence the nuance of language

As AI algorithms improve, scientists are still facing some difficulties, including language translations. But first: There’s been a lot of talk about an economic downturn lately, and in the middle of it all is the American consumer. Turns out, consumer spending might just be what’s keeping the U.S. economy afloat. But can consumers save the economy from a recession? Then, the number of video streaming services is on the rise. We look into the growing monthly costs for consumers. Also, the latest drink of the summer: White Claw.

When the bottom line isn’t everything

The Business Roundtable, a lobbying group comprised of about 200 CEOs, today announced a change in its definition of a corporation’s purpose: Shareholder value should no longer be their main objective, and they should prioritize customers and employees. This might just lead to a delicate balancing act to keep shareholders, customers and employees happy. We break it all down and what it could mean for the future of the corporate world.  Also, we take a closer look at the challenges surrounding cashless restaurants. Then: an interview with Jennifer Silva, on her book which examines the economic realities in the heart of coal country.

Even back-to-school season has its influencers now

YouTubers have started monetizing one of the biggest consumer moments in a kid’s life: the first day back at school. But first: yield curve inversions, trade wars and recessions, oh my! Remember to take a deep breath while we break it all down. This week, Netflix reported its U.S. subscriber loss in almost eight years. What does that mean for the company’s future? Then, how oat milk entered the mainstream.

Dive into the ~inverted yield curve~

Markets panicked yesterday because the yield on 10-year government bonds dropped below that of 2-year bonds. Today, we’re gonna go deep on the different types of bonds, and why their differences matter. Plus: What high water in the Great Lakes is doing for the region’s economy, and why Pabst is getting in to the whiskey business.

What a city gave up to attract auto jobs

More than 30 years ago Hamtramck, Michigan, was desperate for a GM plant, so desperate that the government used eminent domain to tear down a neighborhood. Today, we look back at how that plant got built — and what happened when the work slowed down. Plus, we’ll do the numbers on today’s huge Dow drop, WeWork’s IPO and the yield curve inversion.

CBS and Viacom are back together

After more than a decade apart, CBS and Viacom announced Tuesday that they are reuniting. Today, we look at how the new company, ViacomCBS, fits into today’s rapidly consolidated media environment. Plus, Trump’s holiday-driven tariff delay and why Tumblr lost so much value.

Protests paralyzing Hong Kong could threaten the global economy

The protests in Hong Kong are now in their 10th week, grounding flights in one of the word’s busiest airports today. The tense situation is beginning to take a toll on the region’s economy — and it has potential to reach much further beyond that. Today, a crash course in what the region means for the global economy. Plus: Nike’s new subscription service for kids and pumpkin spice season? Already?

Penney is a penny

Former retail giant J.C. Penney is a now a “penny stock” and is at risk of being delisted from the New York Stock Exchange. Today, we look at what happens when a company gets delisted. Plus: the future of gig economy workers in California and the unwritten rules of the middle class.

Where does returned merchandise go?

Online shopping has made returns easier than ever — but all that stuff can pile up, and it’s not always in the best shape. Today, we dive into the growing secondary market for your online returns. Plus: How the trade war is affecting food and the growing business of clothes rentals.